A major area of responsibility of Universities Australia is the monitoring of government legislation and policies with implications for the ownership and use of copyright materials by staff and students in universities.  Guides and information are available to assist universities to develop clear policies on the use of copyright works, and managing ownership of intellectual property generated by them.

In accordance with the requirements of the Copyright Act 1968, Universities Australia and its member universities have signed agreements with both Copyright Agency  and Screenrights. These are copyright collecting societies set up under the Act to collect remuneration from universities copying and communicating print and broadcast copyright material for educational purposes, on behalf of students and staff. Universities Australia negotiates these agreements on behalf of member universities, monitors the effects of the agreements, and assists the independently appointed monitoring bodies with the annual surveys of usage of copyright materials in universities.

Similarly, Universities Australia has negotiated a direct licence with the four music collecting societies - the Australasian Performing Right AssociationAustralasian Mechanical Copyright Owners' SocietyPhonographic Performance Company of Australia, and Australian Record Industry Association - covering copying and communication of musical works and sound recordings, performance of such material in public, and music-on-hold. Universities Australia administers and monitors this licence on behalf of subscribing universities. Information on all three licences can be viewed here.

Universities Australia maintains close liaison with Copyright Officers within its member universities, and provides a resource area for Copyright Officers to access.

Universities Australia is also an active member of the Australian Digital Alliance, and has supported the Australian Information and Communications Technology in Education Committee in its advice and submissions to Government on copyright matters.

Information Policy and Copyright Information

Inquiry into Copyright and the Digital Economy 9 Aug 2013
Universities Australia made a submission in response to the Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC) discussion paper on Copyright and the Digital Economy in August 2013.
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UA Response to the ALRC discussion paper on Copyright and the Digital Economy (pdf 454.4KB) 31 Jul 2013
Submission in response to the Australian Law Reform Commission discussion paper on Copyright and the Digital Economy
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Supplementary submission to the ALRC Issues Paper: Copyright and the Digital Economy (pdf 193.3KB) 7 May 2013
Supplementary comments from UA on voluntary licensing versus statutory licensing for educational copying. Universities Australia provides this supplementary submission to the ALRC to elaborate the case that voluntary licensing for educational copying would be successful and practical in Australia as it is in many other jurisdictions. Voluntary licensing of content used by educational institutions is operating effectively and efficiently in many jurisdictions both in Australia and globally. A voluntary licensing regime would enable universities to take advantage of emerging models that allow teachers and researchers to access, use and distribute copyright materials for teaching and scholarship. It would also be more clearly aligned with a concept of copyright as a property right.
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Response to the ALRC Issues Paper: Copyright and the Digital Economy (pdf 646KB) 30 Nov 2012
Copyright is rapidly emerging as the next major intellectual property challenge for all leading industrialised economies due to the ever-increasing pervasiveness of digital technology. The same challenges are arising in the higher education sector. Teaching, learning and research increasingly rely on the Internet for access to and dissemination of information. As this review takes place, policy makers around the world are actively reconsidering the relationship between copyright exceptions and innovation, research, and economic growth, with a view to ensuring that their economies are capable of fully utilising digital technology to remain competitive in a global market.
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Response to the ALRC Issues Paper: Copyright and the Digital Economy (pdf 747.1KB) 30 Nov 2012
Response to the ALRC Issues Paper: Copyright and the Digital Economy
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