Universities Australia made a submission in response to the Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC) discussion paper on Copyright and the Digital Economy in August 2013.

In our response to the Issues Paper, Universities Australia submitted that Australia‟s inflexible copyright exceptions, together with the educational statutory licences, were affecting the ability of Australian universities to create and disseminate knowledge, and placing the Australian higher education sector at an international competitive disadvantage.

The principles-based regime outlined in the Discussion Paper would go a long way towards addressing the problems highlighted in our earlier submission. If enacted, it would deliver the flexibility that is so urgently needed to encourage research and innovation, while still protecting the rights of copyright owners. It would remove obstacles that currently stand in the way of Australian universities fully utilising digital technology, and would bring Australian copyright law in line with comparable jurisdictions with more adaptive copyright regimes. The proposed reforms would put Australian universities on a level playing field as they seek to attract the best and brightest students in an increasingly globalised and competitive higher education market.

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Submissions, Articles & Documents

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UA Response to the ALRC discussion paper on Copyright and the Digital Economy (pdf 454.4KB) 31 Jul 2013
Submission in response to the Australian Law Reform Commission discussion paper on Copyright and the Digital Economy
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Supplementary submission to the ALRC Issues Paper: Copyright and the Digital Economy (pdf 193.3KB) 7 May 2013
Supplementary comments from UA on voluntary licensing versus statutory licensing for educational copying. Universities Australia provides this supplementary submission to the ALRC to elaborate the case that voluntary licensing for educational copying would be successful and practical in Australia as it is in many other jurisdictions. Voluntary licensing of content used by educational institutions is operating effectively and efficiently in many jurisdictions both in Australia and globally. A voluntary licensing regime would enable universities to take advantage of emerging models that allow teachers and researchers to access, use and distribute copyright materials for teaching and scholarship. It would also be more clearly aligned with a concept of copyright as a property right.
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Response to the ALRC Issues Paper: Copyright and the Digital Economy (pdf 646KB) 30 Nov 2012
Copyright is rapidly emerging as the next major intellectual property challenge for all leading industrialised economies due to the ever-increasing pervasiveness of digital technology. The same challenges are arising in the higher education sector. Teaching, learning and research increasingly rely on the Internet for access to and dissemination of information. As this review takes place, policy makers around the world are actively reconsidering the relationship between copyright exceptions and innovation, research, and economic growth, with a view to ensuring that their economies are capable of fully utilising digital technology to remain competitive in a global market.
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Response by Universities Australia to the draft Terms of Reference for the ALRC Review on Copyright and the Digital Economy (pdf 100.5KB) 24 Apr 2012
Response by Universities Australia to the draft terms of reference for the Australian Law Reform Commission reference on copyright and the digital economy July 2012.
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