Universities Australia advocates for increased numbers of students to include an international study component as part of their degree. Participating in a mobility program can have immeasurable benefits for both the students and the university, and more broadly for future employers. An international study experience assists students in building international networks, increasing cross-cultural competency, fosters independent thought and learning and encourages individuals to step outside of their comfort zone. These are useful and relevant skills for students to use in their studies domestically as well, so universities reap the benefit of having their students study abroad.

The Australian Government is committed to the goal of having  more Australian university students studying overseas, with a greater proportion of them undertaking part of their degree in Asia. This has been demonstrated through their commitment to the New Colombo Plan and other mobility programs. The Australian Government currently invests more than $200 million each year in international scholarships that, at any time, support around 5000 international students, researchers and professionals to study in Australia and for Australians to study, research and undertake professional development overseas.

The proportion of Australian students with an international study experience increased from 8.8 per cent of domestic bachelor graduates in 2008 to 16.5 per cent in 2014 (AUIDF, 2015). This is comparable with the United States undergraduate participation rate of 14.8 per cent in 2013-14 (Institute for International Education, 2015).

The increase in Australian students' international study experiences has been achieved with increased financial support, mostly from universities, supplemented by OS-HELP, the Australian Government's loan for eligible undergraduate students. OS-HELP loans are repaid by students on the same conditions as other HELP loans.

World Class Strategy

In June 2013, Universities Australia signed an agreement with the Department of Industry, Innovation, Climate Change, Science, Research and Tertiary Education (now the Department of Education and Training) to lead the development of of an information and communications strategy to promote student mobility. The strategy, World Class, has assisted in better promoting the availability of student mobility programs, the benefit of participation in a mobility program and the options for financial support that are available to students.

As part of the strategy, Universities Australia commissioned both an extensive amount of research on all aspects of student mobility, from an audit of existing mobility programs in 2013, through to intensive research of attitudes toward student mobility among key audiences.

The most recent publications include a longitudinal report on perceptions toward mobility among university students and an extensive literature review and research piece on the outcomes of participation in mobility programs and trends in the student mobility landscape.

The longitudinal research, conducted by Rob Lawrence of Prospect Research and Marketing, included a series of town hall style focus groups and an online survey of almost 9,000 students, and examined their understanding of student mobility, their satisfaction with participation and their willingness to be involved in student mobility programs. It is one of the most comprehensive surveys of its kind and will greatly assist universities in their future marketing of mobility programs to their student cohort. 

The literature review and trends report, conducted by the International Education Association of Australia (IEAA) is a three piece review of the current state of student mobility in Australia. It includes:

  • Outcomes of Learning Abroad Programs (Dr Davina Potts);
  • International Trends in Learning Abroad (Dr Cate Gribble, Dr Ly Tran); and
  • Learning Abroad at Australian Universities: The Current Environment (Leanne Harrison, Dr Davina Potts).

The three reports analyse the benefits of participation in student mobility programs, from personal development through to career outcomes, and what this means for Australian students; the current environment for student mobility in Australia, including the financial support provided by the Australian Government; and an analysis of current global trends in student mobility. The work is an important stock take of student mobility in Australia and highlights the considerable benefits for society in having internationally experienced graduates. As we move into an era where students are increasingly looking to improve their skills and enhance their employability, research which demonstrates the link between mobility and career development will become ever more important.

The reports can be found below.

More information about World Class can be found here.

The Australia in the Asian century white paper outlines the goal to have more Australian university students studying overseas, with a greater proportion of them undertaking part of their degree in Asia. The proportion of Australian students with an international study experience increased from 8.8 per cent of domestic bachelor graduates in 2008 to 12.3 per cent in 2011. This is still below the 14 per cent of US bachelor students who study abroad.

The increase in Australian students' international study experiences was achieved with increased financial support, mostly from universities supplemented by OS-HELP, the Australian Government's loan of up to $5,824 for eligible undergraduate students. OS-HELP loans are repaid by students on the same conditions as other HELP loans. The Australian Government currently invests more than $200 million each year in international scholarships that, at any time, support around 5000 international students, researchers and professionals to study in Australia and for Australians to study, research and undertake professional development overseas.The awards have two streams: an achievement stream to support the most able students, researchers and professionals to come to Australia and for Australians to study offshore; and a development stream that builds capacity in developing countries. universities Australia

In January 2014 eligibility for OS-HELP will be expanded to included postgraduate students and students involved in clinical placement or work experience programs. The maximum loan amount will be increased to $7,500 for those students choosing an Asian destination for their overseas study experience.

The Vladivostok declaration of the APEC forum in September 2012 supported efforts to enhance the mobility of students, researchers and education institutions within APEC by increasing cooperation in higher education. This is elaborated in the declaration's Annex D -- promoting cross-border education cooperation. It proposes that the mobility of
students be enhanced by:
  • identifying, comparing and implementing best practices among APEC economies for course accreditation and quality assurance systems, as well as targeted capacity-building projects developing models to guide reform and implementation of good regulatory practices, drawing on case studies of domestic education providers
  • exploring ways to increase the transparency of student visa requirements.

In June 2013, Universities Australia signed an agreement with the Department of Industry, Innovation, Climate Change, Science, Research and Tertiary Education to lead the development of of an information and communications strategy to promote student mobility. The strategy, which is called World Class, will assist to better promote the availability of student mobility programs, the benefit of participation in a mobility program and the options for financial support that are available to students.

More information about World Class can be found here.

- See more at: http://www.universitiesaustralia.edu.au/page/policy---advocacy/international/student-mobility-/#sthash.iiikblhq.dpuf
The Australia in the Asian century white paper outlines the goal to have more Australian university students studying overseas, with a greater proportion of them undertaking part of their degree in Asia. The proportion of Australian students with an international study experience increased from 8.8 per cent of domestic bachelor graduates in 2008 to 12.3 per cent in 2011. This is still below the 14 per cent of US bachelor students who study abroad.

The increase in Australian students' international study experiences was achieved with increased financial support, mostly from universities supplemented by OS-HELP, the Australian Government's loan of up to $5,824 for eligible undergraduate students. OS-HELP loans are repaid by students on the same conditions as other HELP loans. The Australian Government currently invests more than $200 million each year in international scholarships that, at any time, support around 5000 international students, researchers and professionals to study in Australia and for Australians to study, research and undertake professional development overseas.The awards have two streams: an achievement stream to support the most able students, researchers and professionals to come to Australia and for Australians to study offshore; and a development stream that builds capacity in developing countries. universities Australia

In January 2014 eligibility for OS-HELP will be expanded to included postgraduate students and students involved in clinical placement or work experience programs. The maximum loan amount will be increased to $7,500 for those students choosing an Asian destination for their overseas study experience.

The Vladivostok declaration of the APEC forum in September 2012 supported efforts to enhance the mobility of students, researchers and education institutions within APEC by increasing cooperation in higher education. This is elaborated in the declaration's Annex D -- promoting cross-border education cooperation. It proposes that the mobility of
students be enhanced by:
  • identifying, comparing and implementing best practices among APEC economies for course accreditation and quality assurance systems, as well as targeted capacity-building projects developing models to guide reform and implementation of good regulatory practices, drawing on case studies of domestic education providers
  • exploring ways to increase the transparency of student visa requirements.

In June 2013, Universities Australia signed an agreement with the Department of Industry, Innovation, Climate Change, Science, Research and Tertiary Education to lead the development of of an information and communications strategy to promote student mobility. The strategy, which is called World Class, will assist to better promote the availability of student mobility programs, the benefit of participation in a mobility program and the options for financial support that are available to students.

More information about World Class can be found here.

- See more at: http://www.universitiesaustralia.edu.au/page/policy---advocacy/international/student-mobility-/#sthash.iiikblhq.dpuf
The Australia in the Asian century white paper outlines the goal to have more Australian university students studying overseas, with a greater proportion of them undertaking part of their degree in Asia. The proportion of Australian students with an international study experience increased from 8.8 per cent of domestic bachelor graduates in 2008 to 12.3 per cent in 2011. This is still below the 14 per cent of US bachelor students who study abroad.

The increase in Australian students' international study experiences was achieved with increased financial support, mostly from universities supplemented by OS-HELP, the Australian Government's loan of up to $5,824 for eligible undergraduate students. OS-HELP loans are repaid by students on the same conditions as other HELP loans. The Australian Government currently invests more than $200 million each year in international scholarships that, at any time, support around 5000 international students, researchers and professionals to study in Australia and for Australians to study, research and undertake professional development overseas.The awards have two streams: an achievement stream to support the most able students, researchers and professionals to come to Australia and for Australians to study offshore; and a development stream that builds capacity in developing countries. universities Australia

In January 2014 eligibility for OS-HELP will be expanded to included postgraduate students and students involved in clinical placement or work experience programs. The maximum loan amount will be increased to $7,500 for those students choosing an Asian destination for their overseas study experience.

The Vladivostok declaration of the APEC forum in September 2012 supported efforts to enhance the mobility of students, researchers and education institutions within APEC by increasing cooperation in higher education. This is elaborated in the declaration's Annex D -- promoting cross-border education cooperation. It proposes that the mobility of
students be enhanced by:
  • identifying, comparing and implementing best practices among APEC economies for course accreditation and quality assurance systems, as well as targeted capacity-building projects developing models to guide reform and implementation of good regulatory practices, drawing on case studies of domestic education providers
  • exploring ways to increase the transparency of student visa requirements.

In June 2013, Universities Australia signed an agreement with the Department of Industry, Innovation, Climate Change, Science, Research and Tertiary Education to lead the development of of an information and communications strategy to promote student mobility. The strategy, which is called World Class, will assist to better promote the availability of student mobility programs, the benefit of participation in a mobility program and the options for financial support that are available to students.

More information about World Class can be found here.

- See more at: http://www.universitiesaustralia.edu.au/page/policy---advocacy/international/student-mobility-/#sthash.iiikblhq.dpuf
The Australia in the Asian century white paper outlines the goal to have more Australian university students studying overseas, with a greater proportion of them undertaking part of their degree in Asia. The proportion of Australian students with an international study experience increased from 8.8 per cent of domestic bachelor graduates in 2008 to 12.3 per cent in 2011. This is still below the 14 per cent of US bachelor students who study abroad.

The increase in Australian students' international study experiences was achieved with increased financial support, mostly from universities supplemented by OS-HELP, the Australian Government's loan of up to $5,824 for eligible undergraduate students. OS-HELP loans are repaid by students on the same conditions as other HELP loans. The Australian Government currently invests more than $200 million each year in international scholarships that, at any time, support around 5000 international students, researchers and professionals to study in Australia and for Australians to study, research and undertake professional development overseas.The awards have two streams: an achievement stream to support the most able students, researchers and professionals to come to Australia and for Australians to study offshore; and a development stream that builds capacity in developing countries. universities Australia

In January 2014 eligibility for OS-HELP will be expanded to included postgraduate students and students involved in clinical placement or work experience programs. The maximum loan amount will be increased to $7,500 for those students choosing an Asian destination for their overseas study experience.

The Vladivostok declaration of the APEC forum in September 2012 supported efforts to enhance the mobility of students, researchers and education institutions within APEC by increasing cooperation in higher education. This is elaborated in the declaration's Annex D -- promoting cross-border education cooperation. It proposes that the mobility of
students be enhanced by:
  • identifying, comparing and implementing best practices among APEC economies for course accreditation and quality assurance systems, as well as targeted capacity-building projects developing models to guide reform and implementation of good regulatory practices, drawing on case studies of domestic education providers
  • exploring ways to increase the transparency of student visa requirements.

In June 2013, Universities Australia signed an agreement with the Department of Industry, Innovation, Climate Change, Science, Research and Tertiary Education to lead the development of of an information and communications strategy to promote student mobility. The strategy, which is called World Class, will assist to better promote the availability of student mobility programs, the benefit of participation in a mobility program and the options for financial support that are available to students.

More information about World Class can be found here.

- See more at: http://www.universitiesaustralia.edu.au/page/policy---advocacy/international/student-mobility-/#sthash.iiikblhq.dpuf

Universities Australia Mobility Strategy

Audit of student mobility programs 28 Nov 2013
An audit of programs was conducted by Alan Olsen of Strategy, Policy and Research in Education (SPRE), with assistance from Rob Malicki of Aim Overseas. Alan completes similar work for the Australian University International Directors Forum annually ...
IEAA Research on Learning Abroad 7 Jun 2016
in 2016, Universities Australia commissioned the IEAA to conduct three pieces of research on learning abroad. The reports can be found below.
Longitudinal Research on Perceptions of Student Mobility 7 Jun 2016
In 2016, Rob Lawrence of Prospect Research and Marketing conducted extensive longitudinal research on perceptions of outbound mobility among university students. The results of this research are found in the paper below.
Research on attitudes toward mobility 28 Nov 2013
Rob Lawrence of Prospect Research and Marketing was responsible for the extensive qualitative and quantitative research and analysis into attitudes about student mobility.The target audience of this research included current students (who both have a ...